Everything You Need to Know About Eating Herring in Europe

Everything you need to know about eating herring in Europe: An Interview with our resident herring expert [PetiteAdventures.org]

When you think of a European fish delicacy, I can pretty much guarantee the last fish that you’ll think of is herring. Despite being an awesome source of vitamins and minerals, this small, oily fish is often overlooked in favour of its more famous, sexier fish cousins, like tuna or salmon. But, that hadn’t always been the case. For centuries, herring was one of the most important fish foods and even played a pivotal role in the history of marine fisheries in Europe. Since at least 3000 B.C. herring was a staple food source for many European cultures.

Who knew, right?!

Even today, herring plays an important, but understated role in many European cuisines. Whether eaten raw in the Netherlands, fermented or fried in Sweden or pickled throughout much of Scandinavia, Germany, and Central and Eastern Europe, herring is still enjoyed all across Europe.

Somewhere throughout our travels, my travel partner and boyfriend Dave developed a taste for herring. It started as a curiosity which only grew with each city we visited. Very quickly it became a tradition for us to seek out the best herring stand in each city so Dave could sample the local fares and provide me with his review. After having eaten the fish in its various forms in six cities across five countries, I’ve decided that Dave is pretty much an expert in herring. That’s a thing, right?

While we were on holidays in Canada, and his workload was minimal, I politely requested (aka begged, pleaded and hounded him) that he share his experiences of eating herring throughout Europe with the world. Thankfully my charms (and unrelenting nagging) won him over.

So here you have it: Petite Adventures’ resident herring expert, Dave, tells you everything you need to know about eating herring in Europe. Continue reading “Everything You Need to Know About Eating Herring in Europe”

National Dishes From My Travels: Thoughts, Feelings and Reactions

Title Card - National Dishes From My Travels: Thoughts, Feelings and Reactions [PetiteAdventures.org]

As they do with birds, animals and flowers, most countries have a national dish, which in most cases, is a food that’s been prepared for generations; it’s a food that shares history, legends and traditions with each and every forkful. Experiencing a country through food is one of my favourite ways to get to know a new place; it’s really quite astonishing how much you can learn simply by sitting down, digging in and sampling its national fares.

Throughout our travels, I was lucky enough to try the national dish in nine of the 15 countries we’ve visited. As with anything, there were hits and misses. Most of the time my curiosity was rewarded with amazing and surprising flavours, but there were a few odd times where my curiosity got the better of me and I was left with a meal I probably wouldn’t order again.

For the purpose of this post, I’ve only decided to feature national dishes that I ate in that country, for example, I enjoyed a ham hock in Vienna, and although it was delicious and it’s a food the city is famous for, it’s not a national dish. It is, however, a national dish of Germany, but I was too focused on Christmas market beverages to get into the ham hock during our visit to Hamburg, so unfortunately, ham hocks just don’t make the list. I also omitted a couple of foods like Bratwurst (Germany) and Pasta (Italy) because really, what can I say about those delicious meals that hasn’t already been said. And, chances are you’ve probably sampled them somewhere along the way yourself!

So, let’s take a look at my thoughts, feelings and impressions of the national dishes I sampled in 2016: Continue reading “National Dishes From My Travels: Thoughts, Feelings and Reactions”

Petite Adventures’ Guide to Rotterdam

Petite Adventures' Guide to Rotterdam [PetiteAdventures.org]

Rotterdam is the second-largest municipality in the Netherlands, and in so many ways it’s the exact opposite of Amsterdam, which is the largest. Where Amsterdam is old and historic, Rotterdam is new, modern and oftentimes, a little quirky.

It was the perfect stopover between Ghent and Amsterdam, and one we’d definitely recommend to anyone interested in design or architecture.  Continue reading “Petite Adventures’ Guide to Rotterdam”

Rain in Rotterdam

Rotterdam was the third stop of our recent whirlwind tour of Belgium and the Netherlands. If you’d like to get caught, you can read about our experiences in Bruges and Ghent.

Rain in Rotterdam [PetiteAdventures.org]

We awoke the next morning in our hotel room in Ghent, feeling a bit worse for wear thanks to our self-guided pub crawl the night before. If anyone ever tells you Belgian beers aren’t that strong, they are lying.

We spent most of the morning lying in bed, listening to the rain hitting the hotel room window, wishing for the humidity to break. Finally, as checkout time approached, we gathered our things, zipped up our raincoats and reemerged into the world.

The rain continued to fall as we retraced our steps back to the train station. With each step, I was being hit in the face by a thousand tiny droplets, while my hair was being whipped around by the wind. Even with my hood on I wasn’t safe from the elements. Continue reading “Rain in Rotterdam”

Petite Adventures Month in Review: June 2016

Travel Blog Month in Review June 2016 [PetiteAdventures.org}

Well Happy Canada Day and happy Friday, reader-friends! Can you believe it’s time for another Month in Review post?

I can’t.

It seems like just yesterday I was welcoming the beginning of June. But, here we are. Let’s take a look back at the month that was June. Continue reading “Petite Adventures Month in Review: June 2016”